The Best Yarn for Crochet: 15 Beautiful and Practical Options

Every crocheter has their favorite yarn, the one they go to when they need to create something unique and beautiful.

This article will discuss the top yarns for crocheters, why they are loved, what they are good for, and how much yarn you get for your money.

To finish, we will discuss what to look for when selecting a yarn for a specific project. 

Best Budget Yarn
Brava Worsted

When shopping for a budget-friendly yarn, I look for a soft acrylic. I highly recommend the Brava line from We Crochet. You get loads of yarn for the money, and the yarn is incredibly soft.

Yarn from We Crochet


Brava

This super-soft acrylic yarn is the perfect yarn for any project on a budget. At around $3.50-$4.00 per 100-gram skein, this yarn has the bang for your buck that every crocheter needs in their stash.

Available in a vast array of colors, including several variegated and speckled colorways, you can find exactly what you need for any project. 

Check Prices on WeCrochet

  • 218 yards/skein
  • 100% Acrylic
  • Available in DK, Worsted, or Chunky weights

Pros

  • Hypoallergenic
  • Many colors
  • Soft

Cons

  • Acrylic (plastic) can melt and is not very eco-friendly.

Alpaca Cloud Dk

I recently used this yarn to make a sweater, and I have to admit, the word “cloud” is perfect for it! The ultra-soft baby alpaca fiber will keep you cozy in cold weather, but it is also so breathable, it won’t cause you to overheat. 

Check Prices on WeCrochet

  • 123 yards/skein
  • 100% Baby Alpaca
  • Dk weight

Pros

  • Extremely soft
  • High-quality fiber
  • Lots of calm colors to choose from

Cons

  • Higher price point

Fable Fur

Incredibly soft and fuzzy, this yarn looks like it might be an obnoxious novelty yarn but actually creates a thick and cozy fabric that is worth the effort needed to work with it.

Available in many natural colors and a few soft pastels, this yarn is perfect for fuzzy stuffed animals, sweaters, or blankets. 

Check Prices on WeCrochet

  • 71 yds/skein
  • 100% Polyester
  • Super Bulky

Pros

  • Hypoallergenic
  • Extremely soft
  • Unique finished product

Cons

  • Difficult to see stitches and to work with

Swish DK

Looking for an affordable luxury yarn for garments? Look no further than Swish DK!

This yarn is soft, warm, and of a high-quality fiber that will wear well for years to come. At $6.49 per 100-gram skein, this is a great deal for this quality of fiber. 

Check Prices on WeCrochet

  • 123 yards/skein
  • 100% Superwash Merino Wool
  • Also available in worsted and bulky weights

Pros

  • High-quality fiber will wear well
  • Wide variety of colors
  • Soft and easy to work with

Cons

  • May trigger wool or lanolin allergies

Hawthorne 

Fingering weight yarns are gaining popularity in the crochet community. The unique look of hand-dyed yarns can be expensive, but with Hawthorne, you can get a similar look at a fraction of the price. This wool yarn is perfect for shawls, socks, or garments.

Check Prices on WeCrochet 

  • 357 yards/skein
  • 80% Fine Superwash Highland Wool, 20% Polyamide (Nylon)
  • Fine/fingering weight

Pros

  • Get the look of hand-dyed yarn for less
  • Added nylon improves durability
  • Many colors and styles of dye techniques

Cons

  • May trigger wool or lanolin allergies

Yarn from Mary Maxim


Starlette

This staple yarn from the Mary Maxim signature collection is a classic worsted weight acrylic yarn. This budget-friendly yarn is available in a wide range of colors. If you are interested in color-pooling, this is a yarn to investigate. It is also available with a strand of sparkle woven in. 

Check Prices on Mary Maxim

  • 180 yards/skein
  • 100% Acrylic
  • Worsted Weight

Pros

  • One of the few yarns dyed specifically for color-pooling
  • Hypoallergenic
  • Soft on the hands

Cons

  • Acrylic is plastic and might melt at high temperatures

Mellowspun

This lightweight yarn is soft and perfect for baby items, like blankets or sweaters. The acrylic makes this a warm yarn, while the nylon component keeps it bouncy and soft. You can’t go wrong with this easy-to-use yarn. 

Check Prices on Mary Maxim

  • 174 yards/skein
  • 70% Acrylic, 30% Nylons
  • DK/Sportweight

Pros

  • Hypoallergenic
  • Affordable
  • Wide variety of colors

Cons

  • Small skeins of yarn, so you will have a lot of ends to weave in

Baby Blankie Yarn

This ultra-soft, hypoallergenic yarn is dyed in self-patterning colorways. One skein of this yarn will create a soft, unique baby blanket. At $12.99 per skein, you will be able to create an amazing gift at an affordable price. 

Check Prices on Mary Maxim

  • 695 yards/skin
  • 100% Acrylic
  • Worsted weight

Pros

  • One skein makes an entire baby blanket
  • Self-patterning colors make each project unique
  • Hypoallergenic

Cons

  • Limited color choices

Natural Alpaca Tweed

Alpaca is the softest of fibers for wearable items. Whether you are making hats, scarves, or sweaters, this hypoallergenic natural fiber will keep you cozy all winter long. The addition of the tweed gives this yarn a vintage appeal. 

Check Prices on Mary Maxim

  • 262 yards/skein
  • 77% Acrylic, 20% Alpaca, 3% Viscose
  • Worsted weight

Pros

  • Hypoallergenic
  • Warm for cold weather
  • Extremely soft

Cons

  • Limited color selection

Premier Anti-Pilling

After all the work that goes into a beautifully crafted crocheted blanket or hat, how disappointing is it to have it pill and wear out after only a few washes? With Premier Anti-Pilling, your projects will look like new wash after wash. 

Check Prices on Mary Maxim

  • 273 yards/skein
  • 100% Anti-Pilling Acrylic
  • Light/DK

Pros

  • Hypoallergenic
  • Long-lasting quality
  • Many colors to choose from

Cons

  • Only available in lightweight yarn, so it will take more to make a blanket

Yarn from Lovecraft


Paintbox Cotton

With one of the widest arrays of colors, this cotton yarn is the king of variety. Available in both DK or Worsted weight, you can use it for making washcloths, towels, garments, or even amigurumi. At $3.50 per skein, it is also an affordable option for high-quality cotton.

Check Prices on Lovecraft

  • 137 yards/skein
  • 100% Cotton
  • Available in DK or Aran

Pros

  • 49 different colors
  • Hypoallergenic
  • Soft enough for baby blankets

Cons

  • Should not be machine dried

Scheepjes Whirl 

A personal favorite, the Scheepjes Whirl, is perfect for delicate projects, like prayer shawls, lace mandalas, doilies, or delicate garments.

This soft yarn is available in 39 different ombre colors, each one featuring a smooth transition between colors.

Check Prices on Lovecraft

  • 1094 yards/skein
  • 60% Cotton, 40% Acrylic
  • Fingering weight

Pros

  • Acrylic blend adds warmth and softness to the cotton
  • Unique colors that blend smoothly together
  • Lots of yarn per skein

Cons

  • Loosely wound and prone to splitting

Scheepjes Stone Washed

This cotton/acrylic blend yarn is perfect for lightweight summer tops or unique amigurumi. The stone-washed effect of the dye gives each piece a vintage, retro look.

With 23 shades to choose from, you are sure to find the right color for your next project. 

Check Prices on Lovecraft

  • 142 yards/skein
  • 78% Cotton, 22% Acrylic
  • Available in Sport or Worsted weights

Pros

  • Unique dye technique
  • Soft on the skin
  • Stitches won’t stretch over time

Cons

  • Fewer shades in the worsted weight variety

Yarn from Amazon


Aunt Lydia’s

Is there anything more classic than Aunt Lydia’s cotton thread? This mercerized cotton is available in a wide variety of colors. You will need steel crochet hooks to work with this crochet thread, which is commonly used to make lace bedspreads, curtains, and doilies.

Check Prices on Amazon

  • 1000 yards/skein
  • 100% Mercerized cotton
  • Available in thread weights 3, 10, 30

Pros

  • Hypoallergenic
  • Extremely consistent thickness
  • Very lightweight and delicate

Cons

  • So light and fine, it can be hard on the eyes and hands

Bernat Blanket

The ever-popular Bernat Blanket yarn has as many uses as it has colorways! It has been used for blankets (obviously), but also garments, pillows, and oversized stuffed animals. Since this yarn is so chunky, your project will work up in a flash!

Check Prices on Amazon

  • 220 yards/skein
  • 100% Polyester
  • Super Bulky

Pros

  • Projects work up quickly
  • Hypoallergenic
  • Lots of inspiration available

Cons

  • Yarn is so bulky, it can cause wrist pain

How to choose yarn for a project

Buying crochet yarn online has never been easier, but different yarns work best for different projects, so here are some tips on what to look for before making your choice.

Yarn for Blankets

Modern Honeycomb Ripple Baby Blanket CrochetKim Free Tunisian Crochet Pattern

When choosing the yarn for your next blanket project, consider the weight of the yarn and the fiber content. 

Yarn weight

Generally, blankets are made with worsted or chunky weight yarns to help the large project progress quickly; however, DK or sport weight yarns are popular for smaller blankets, like throws or baby blankets

Fiber content

Many crocheters use acrylic yarns for blankets since these yarns are affordable.

Acrylic blankets can be very warm, but they aren’t breathable, so they may cause the user to perspire. Cotton yarn is popular for baby blankets or those in warmer climates. 


Yarn for Sweaters

Baby sweater

Anything that will be worn next to the skin needs to be soft. You will also want a long-wearing yarn that will not pill or fray with continued use. 

Yarn weight

Sweaters can be made with any weight yarn, but keep in mind that the bulkier the yarn, the bulkier the fit.

Light weight yarns create a nice fabric that drapes gently around the body without adding bulk.

Bulky yarns are especially good for oversized cardigan sweaters, while lightweight yarns are better for more fitted designs. 

Fiber content

Superwash wool is popular for garments because it is long-wearing, easy to take care of, and breathable. Other popular fibers are alpaca for its softness and cotton for its comfort in warm weather. 


Yarns for Hats

Crochet hat

Heads vary in size, so look for a comfy yarn that has some stretch!

Yarn weight

Hats are generally made with worsted weight or bulky weight yarns, so they can be made quickly. But many popular hat patterns also use lightweight yarns to create a slouchy look. 

Fiber content

Acrylic, nylon, and wool are popular for hats because they possess a natural stretch. These fibers will ensure that the hat will fit snugly on various head sizes since no two people are the same size.


Yarn for Lace

Rose Petal Lace Crochet Stitch

With winter around the corner, crochet lace snowflake season is here! 

Yarn weight

Traditionally, lace is made with mercerized cotton thread, which is much finer than yarn. However, if you find working with thread hard on your eyes and hands, opt for a Dk weight. Your project will be much bigger but still beautiful. 

Fiber content

Cotton is the best fiber for making lace since it holds its shape well over a long period. 

Explore our Lace Crochet Stitch Library


Yarn for Shawls

Lunar Crossings Shawl

When choosing yarn for shawls, look for something lightweight that will drape nicely. 

Yarn weight

Most shawls call for Dk weight yarn or lighter, with many patterns calling for fingering weight. These lightweight yarns help define the stitches and elegance of the shawl patterns

Fiber content

Shawls can be made with any fiber. Generally, wool is used for shawls that will be used in the cooler months, and cotton is used for summer shawls. 


Yarn for Amigurumi

When making a stuffed animal, you need a yarn that won’t stretch. If you choose a yarn with more stretch and bounce, like wool or acrylic, you need to use a smaller hook to ensure the stitches are tight with no gaps between them. 

Yarn weight

Stuffed animals have been made in miniature with thread and in jumbo proportion, using Bernat Blanket yarn. You can use the same pattern with different weight yarns to get different sizes. 

Fiber content

Cotton and polyester yarns generally do not have a lot of stretch to them, so they are perfect for the tight stitches of amigurumi. While you can use wool or acrylic yarn, you will need to pull your stitches tighter. 

The best yarn for crochet

The best yarn for crochet is one you love to work with. Crocheting is a personal art form! Express your creativity through fiber using the yarns you love the best. 

Read: The different types of crochet yarn explained